Alison Hill

Three poems below from sources including Alison's pamphlet collection, 'Peppercorn Rent' published by Flarestack Currently piecing together a new collection Alison is also in the running for this year's Forward Prize. Her poems have appeared in a range of magazines including Orbis, Fire, Envoi, ARTEMISpoetry, Ripple, Pulsar and Obsessed With Pipework.
Her collection, Slate Rising, was published in April 2014 by Indigo Press.

Alison's website


Blush


She liked to collect pink lightbulbs
neatly, in her third drawer down.

She knew they would be found;
her secret stash, her weakness
for a soft glow to warm the edges
of the darkening room
as she tapped   out   time
with hot-pink nails on old hands.

She liked to watch the light
shifting through the delphiniums,
creeping up the sliding hallway
to prod spring bulbs into life.

She liked to watch the dawn,
to catch the first glimmers
of the varnish-streaked sky –
the pink lightbulbs neat
in her third drawer down.

Ripple, 2008
Peppercorn Rent, 2008



Staving off a Natural Disaster


                             
And if by some miracle
the sun rose again at noon
and we started to fly backwards,
the earth around the moon, what then?

Would we see that particular drama
emerging in the static atmosphere,
huddled in our own small lives?        
                                          
Would we recognise the tilt away
from our perceived normality,           
towards the aching chaos?

Ink, Sweat & Tears, 2011



Floundering



She listened for the wind, judging its direction
with the tip of her first finger.

She wondered if he’d pass by tonight, salt-
licked and exhausted. She never knew.

She left a light burning, the shutters ajar
and climbed under her blue-tongued eiderdown

as the waves battered the old walls and lights
flashed on/off on/off through her dreams.

He crashed into her sleep just before five,
splashed into bed before sprawling, comatose.

So this is what she had longed for, pined for,
through the long, dark winter.

Norwich Writers’ Anthology, 2012




No comments:

Post a Comment